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Childhood obesity

The percentage of children with obesity in the United States has more than tripled since the 1970s. Today, about one in five school-aged children (ages 6–19) has obesity.

Obesity is defined as having excess body fat.3 Overweight is defined as having excess body weight for a particular height from fat, muscle, bone, water, or a combination of these factors.Body mass index, or BMI, is a widely used screening tool for measuring both overweight and obesity. BMI percentile is preferred for measuring children and young adults (ages 2–20) because it takes into account that they are still growing, and growing at different rates depending on their age and sex. Health professionals use growth charts to see whether a child’s weight falls into a healthy range for the child’s height, age, and sex.

Childhood obesity is a serious medical condition that affects children and adolescents. Children who are obese are above the normal weight for their age and height.

This is because people in general do not know how to lose weight fast and with health.

Childhood obesity is particularly troubling because the extra pounds often start children on the path to health problems that were once considered adult problems — diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Many obese children become obese adults, especially if one or both parents are obese. Childhood obesity can also lead to poor self-esteem and depression.

One of the best strategies to reduce childhood obesity is to improve the eating and exercise habits of your entire family. Treating and preventing childhood obesity helps protect your child’s health now and in the future.

High school students are drinking less soda, according to the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The most recent data reveal that among U.S. high school students, 20.4 percent drank soda at least once a day in 2015, down from 27.0 percent in 2013, and 27.8 in 2011.

High school students are spending more recreational time on computers, watching less television, and struggling to get enough physical activity, according to the most recent Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) report released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The 2015 data reveal that among U.S. high school students, 41.7 percent used a computer three or more hours a day for fun outside of school work, up from 41.3 percent in 2013, and 31.1 percent in 2011.

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century. The problem is global and is steadily affecting many low- and middle-income countries, particularly in urban settings. The prevalence has increased at an alarming rate. Globally, in 2015 the number of overweight children under the age of five, is estimated to be over 42 million. Almost half of all overweight children under 5 lived in Asia and one quarter lived in Africa.

Overweight and obese children are likely to stay obese into adulthood and more likely to develop noncommunicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. Overweight and obesity, as well as their related diseases, are largely preventable. Prevention of childhood obesity therefore needs high priority.

The WHO Member States in the 66th World Health Assembly have agreed on a voluntary global NCD target to halt the rise in diabetes and obesity.

The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescents is defined according to the WHO growth reference for school-aged children and adolescents (overweight = one standard deviation body mass index for age and sex, and obese = two standard deviations body mass index for age and sex).

This is because people in general do not know how to lose weight fast and with health.